Category Archives: Small batch spirits

Prickly in Pink

Sundayfunday, brunch on, and all that jazz!!!  If you can help it – do no labor on Labor Day, but honor and celebrate those who have paved the way.  We all have a hero… and, hell, we are heroes, too.

Enjoy this sipper and give a toast of appreciation.

Prickly in Pink 

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3oz Don Ciccio E Figli Prickly Pear Liqueur — 1 oz Absolut Citron — 3/4oz Fresh blueberry juice — Scant absinthe rinse — Top with sparkling water, to taste (Or Champagne, if you’ve labored REALLY hard)

 

 

Barrel-aged Coffee Infused Mezcal – Bitter and Bittererer

Yesterday I infused 6oz of El Scorpion Mezcal with 1/3 cup whole French Roast coffee beans.  After 24 hours, I strained the Mezcal – it was a dark, rich chocolate color.  Almost a full ounce of it surrendered itself to the beans. I poured half for today (later on today, rather) and half into my oak barrel.  I will report back in several days…

 

Bitter and Bittererer

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2pt Coffee Bean Infused Scorpion Mezcal Silver — 1pt Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth — 1pt Scarlet Ibis rum — 1/2pt Benedictine — 4 dashes each El Guapo Whiskey Barrel-aged Cocoa Tea and Titze Bear’s Den Aromatic Bitters Pour half for now, other half in barrel (I previously barrel-aged a boulevardier in mine)

“The Wry Smile” recipe

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The Wry Smile

2oz St. George’s Spirits Dry Rye Gin

3/4oz Bonal

1/2oz Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth

1/2oz Pedro Ximenez Sherry

1/2oz Homemade Cherry syrup

4 dashes Embitterment Orange Bitters

SPR

 

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Smoking Gun – Molecular Gastronomy

I purchased a hand held smoker, and it was interesting and exciting to use.  Within 30 seconds, I was able to add hickory flavor to my maple n’ rye old fashioned.  Yum!  More deets later, cuz I have a day job.  Will add link to the smoker as well…

 

Where There’s Smoke …

 

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2oz Redemption Rye Whiskey — 3/4oz Maple Simple Syrup (2:1) — 6 dashes El Guapo Whiskey Barrel Aged Cocoa Tea Bitters — 1 Barspoon luxardo Maraschino Syrup – Mix well with ice and strain — SPR

 

*Update – I like this contraption.  My drink tastes smoky – and that was my intent.  The more smoke I added, the smokier the taste… once again – it did what it said it would do…  The instructions are clear and easy to execute.  It comes with 4 double A batteries that will eventually need replacing, but I like that it’s cordless – which makes it super portable.  Finally, one minor ding – the wood chips come in a container that is wider than the surface area of the chamber you put them in… That makes it messy – but I’m sure we can find a way around that.  Hell, a zip loc with a hole in the corner would do… Will report back in a few months regarding how well it’s holding up.

 

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Oak Aging of Spirits

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Barrel-aged Boulevardier

I truly enjoyed my barrel-aging experience with the American White Oak Barrel I purchased on Amazon from Brew Naturally. *There are many other barrels out there that I’m sure are quite as good. I’m just sharing the specific one that I purchased…

Oak Aging is a process that I am fascinated with and passionate about. Once I learned the complicated – yet magical – chemical processes involved in aging spirits in wood, my respect for aged spirits deepened.

Let’s talk a little bit about wood. Wood is the PERFECT vessel to age spirits in. It has various natural sugars; chemical compounds called “lactones” that impart flavor and aroma; and tannins – which add color, aroma, and flavor. It is also porous – which allows evaporation to occur, and a small amount oxygen in (necessary for oxidation of the spirit, which also imparts color – browning apples, anyone?!) – whilst allowing spirit to stay in, as well. 

Perfect, right? 

American White Oak (Quercus Alba)  is often used to mature spirits.  There are several reasons for this 1) It is abundant in the Northern Hemisphere, particularly the Ozarks; 2) porosity allows for a) evaporation of spirit, b) oxidation (small amount of oxygen enters), c) pliability for barrel making; 3) high tannin content, w/potential for imparting over 400 different flavor/aromatic combinations to aging spirit

There are 3 components to Oak  (Quercus genus) heartwood:

  1. Cellulose –  40% mass of the wood, this organic compound has strength and chemical resistance.  It helps the wood maintain structure and remain durable.  
  2. Hemicellulose – 25% mass of the wood, also an organic compound, and is present in most plant cell walls, as is cellulose.  It has various sugars with lower molecular weights than cellulose- assisting in solubility of alcohol.  We have hemicellulose to thank for the “red layer” in charred oak barrels. 
  3. Lignin – 5-10% mass of wood – tannins!  As mentioned above, these polyphenolic compounds contain the potential for imparting 400 flavor/aromatic combinations to aging spirit!   

The constant interaction between the spirit and the (charred) wood barrel allows the 6 major processes of wood aging to occur:

  1. Extraction – Water and alcohol soak into the oak, extracting flavor and sweetness from the charred inside of the wood
  2. Evaporation – Depending on climate –  evaporation (“angel’s share” ) can account for 3-10% loss annually
  3. Oxidation – Evaporated spirit creates space in barrel, allowing air to enter into the barrel. O2 in the air forms aromatic compounds by dissolving into spirit — this is where “terroir” enters – which gives various spirits their unique “taste of place” (I’m thinking briny, seaweed infused Islay Scotch)
  4. Concentration – Depending on climate – water evaporates faster than alcohol, or conversely, alcohol evaporates faster. Either way, the volume of spirit is reduced, concentrating the aromas and flavors the magical (ok, so – yes – science – but it seems magical!) extraction/oxidation aging processes have imparted
  5. Filtration – Charred inner layer (red layer) allows filtration to occur, smoothing the spirit by absorbing sulfur and aldehyde compounds
  6. Coloration – Red layer, now caramelized by charring the inside of the barrel, adds reddish color to spirit, and oxidation colors further, adding brownish shade 

Phew!  Amazing stuff!  Now that we’ve distilled the oak aging process – don’t you just want some tawny, liquid sunshine?! Thank you oak, thank you chemistry, thank you terroir –  thank you, thank you!!!!! 

In closing, I am stoked and humbled knowing that so much dynamic chemistry is occurring during oak aging.  The ability to age cocktails at home is no gimmicky, dismissive project.  There is science/magic going on in there – and that is not to be taken for granted.

SPR

___________.  Certified Specialist of Spirits Study Guide, 2015. Washington, D.C.: The Society of Wine Educators, 2015.

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Light, fresh Summer cocktails – just add fresh JUICE!

It is hot as hell here in the D.C. Metropolitan area.  And humid – really damn humid! Times (and climates) like these can make us question our imbibing lifestyle.  To drink, or not to drink?  Cuz…  dehydration is real.

Well, friends, my answer to that question is – always and forever – drink!

In addition to the heat, I know there is pressure to focus on neutral alcohols such as vodka, gin – and lighter white wines.  Eating and drinking seasonally, and all that.

Bah!  Drink what you want!  And if you have a serious hankering for aged spirits (like me!) lighten up those brown spirits with some fresh pressed fruit juice.  Juicers are very inexpensive now (I got mine for $60 and am lovin’ it!) and though they are annoying to clean – they are worth the effort.  Below, an example of how I am staying true to my dedicated life of drinking, as well as my preference for the brown!

 

 


Naughty Apple

1 1/2 oz Laird’s Applejack

1 1/4oz Fresh Apple Juice (I juiced a whole apple, and had some extra juice)

1oz Don Ciccio & Figli Finocchietto

3/4oz Dolin Dry Vermouth

Laphroiag Rinse

SPR

 

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Fat-Washing Spirits

Whoa. What an appetizing name!  Yes, I get it – our sometimes health obsessed society shudders at the word fat. But hell, fat has flavor. And you know what else has flavor – damn straight – it’s whiskey!

Alcohol’s ability to extract both fat-soluble and water-soluble flavor compounds makes fat-washing a concept made in heaven – no matter how unappealing it may sound.

 

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Pig in a Pear Tree (name courtesy of @fikafiend on IG)

4oz Fat washed 1729 Bourbon – washed with Sausage grease

2oz fresh Apricot/Cilantro/Lime juice (2 Apricots, 1 Lime, half handful Cilantro

Teaspoon of homemade Pear Preserves (I purchased from yard sale!) 1/4 tsp additional Pear Preserve syrup

1oz Lime Oleo Saccharum

4 dashes Angostura bitters

Dry shake the ingredients in a cocktail shaker for 20-30 sec.  Add ice and shake for additional 15 sec. Strain into chilled glass. Separation is normal with fresh fruit juice. 

Fat-washed Bourbon:  

Mix 3 pts. Bourbon with 1pt. sausage grease until mixture becomes opaque, and place in sealed freezable container.  The process of freezing the mixture is perfect, as it allows the fat to freeze on top of the liquid alcohol, which has a freezing point much lower than commercial freezer temps (high proof alcohol, that is). This makes extraction of the fat a breeze.

Freeze overnight, or at least 6-8 hours. Once frozen to the point where fat has solidified on surface, take a butter knife and wedge between inside of container and fat – essentially “ejecting” the hockey puck-like disc of fat and revealing the still liquid bourbon beneath.  Or skim the fat, if you prefer.  Discard the fat and strain the Bourbon through a cheesecloth lined sieve, or coffee filter.   Done, and done. 

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Kinda looks like a hockey puck, right?!

Below: same principle – similar recipe – different pork fat – BACON!

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